Trafficking of ornamental fishes from Brazil

For the discussion of catfish systematics. Post here to draw our attention to new publications or to discuss existing works.
Post Reply
User avatar
bekateen
Posts: 7772
Joined: Tue Sep 09, 2014 5:50 pm
I've donated: $40.00!
My articles: 4
My images: 82
My cats species list: 125 (i:37, k:49)
My aquaria list: 30 (i:13)
My BLogs: 37 (i:126, p:1909)
My Wishlist: 39
Spotted: 152
Location 1: USA, California, Stockton
Location 2: USA, California, Stockton
Contact:

Trafficking of ornamental fishes from Brazil

Post by bekateen »

BELTRÃO, Hélio et al. TRAFFICKING OF ORNAMENTAL FISH IN THE BRAZILIAN AMAZON. Bulletin of the Fisheries Institute , [Sl], (47), Nov. 2021. ISSN 1678-2305. Date accessed: 18 July 2022. doi: https://doi.org/10.20950/1678-2305/bip.2021.47.e639 .

https://www.pesca.sp.gov.br/boletim/ind ... /view/1621
PDF: https://www.pesca.sp.gov.br/boletim/ind ... /1621/1516
Abstract
The trafficking of ornamental fish is growing on a yearly basis in the Brazilian Amazon. This represents a serious threat to the biodiversity of the region. The objective of this research was to evaluate the trafficking of ornamental fish in the Brazilian Amazon using data from the seizures by the Federal Police and Brazilian Institute of Environment and Renewable Natural Resources - IBAMA. To assess and quantify this illegal trade, we gathered data relating to the period between January 2003 and January 2020. Information was obtained from IBAMA - Amazon - regional superintendence; National Amazon Research Institute - INPA regarding smuggled species that have been recovered and placed in its fish collection. The results show that in 98 seizures made by IBAMA, a total of 170,849 specimens of at least 73 species of 10 families, and 5 orders were recovered. Most of the illegally trafficked species are from the Loricariidae family (31 species, 8.47%). Hypancistrus zebra (Loricariidae), Potamotrygon jabuti, Potamotrygon leopoldi (Potamotrygonidae), Osteoglossum bicirrhosum and Osteoglossum ferreirai (Osteoglossidae) are the most targeted by the traffickers, due to their high value. At least 12 species are undescribed new species and were registered and placed in INPA’s fish collection. The fish followed different routes to reach the border that Brazil, Colombia, and Peru share. We conclude that in order to fight this illegal trade, tougher laws against smugglers, agreements with neighboring countries to combat trafficking, formal environmental education programs for riverine populations, and further scientific studies of smuggled species are necessary.
Image
http://youtube.com/user/Bekateen1
Would you like to buy my fish? Click HERE for prices.
Buying caves from https://plecocaves.com? Plecocaves is now sponsoring Bekateen's Fishroom. Use coupon code "bekateen" (no quotes) for 15% off your order.
Woodh
Posts: 147
Joined: Wed Apr 14, 2021 12:28 pm
My cats species list: 5 (i:2, k:5)
My aquaria list: 1 (i:1)
Spotted: 6
Location 1: Linkoping
Location 2: Sweden

Re: Trafficking of ornamental fishes from Brazil

Post by Woodh »

And here I thought, naively?, that the aquarium trade helps perserve areas that would otherwise be burnt down like the rest. I am just a dumb dork with a computer on the other side of the world though but don't really wish to be part of eradicating animals from the wild. Although I believe it's pretty much a lost cause and that any, realistic, counter measures are like taking a pee on a forest fire, no pun intended.

Anyway before long I fear the specimen in aquariums will be all that's left, I suppose that is better than having none left? Not really sure if this reply is relevant just needed to vent some.
Ltygress
Posts: 80
Joined: Mon Sep 28, 2015 1:13 pm
My cats species list: 11 (i:1, k:2)
My BLogs: 3 (i:6, p:157)
Spotted: 2
Location 1: United States
Location 2: Georgia

Re: Trafficking of ornamental fishes from Brazil

Post by Ltygress »

bekateen wrote: Mon Jul 18, 2022 3:24 pm We conclude that in order to fight this illegal trade, tougher laws against smugglers, agreements with neighboring countries to combat trafficking, formal environmental education programs for riverine populations, and further scientific studies of smuggled species are necessary.
[/quote]
Part of what bothers me is the complete lack of oversight from online selling platforms. I went through ebay a couple of days ago and searched L046 just to see who still bothered selling them there. The first (and only) result was from a guy/company that claimed he was selling F1 offspring from "wild caught" specimens. MAYBE he's not breaking the law selling the offspring, but he DID break the law in getting his breeders and plainly stated it on the listing!

Unfortunately, Aquabid has been just as bad. Back in 2016 they had an L046 seller (can't recall his username) VERY PLAINLY stating that his fish were wild caught. I even engaged in conversation with him TWICE, and he fully admitted in one message that they were not brought over legally. I reported the listing, yet he was still on there for about 6 more months before he finally disappeared. And he was selling "wild-caught" zebras the entire time.
Post Reply