First record of natural mating behavior of Pseudoplatystoma corruscans

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First record of natural mating behavior of Pseudoplatystoma corruscans

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Pachla, L. A., Hartmann, P. B., Massaro, M. V., Bastian, R., Pelicice, F. M., & Reynalte‐Tataje, D. A. (2020). First record of the mating behavior of the spotted surubim Pseudoplatystoma corruscans in the Uruguay River. Journal of Fish Biology. First published: 12 July 2020 https://doi.org/10.1111/jfb.14459

https://onlinelibrary.wiley.com/doi/abs ... /jfb.14459
ABSTRACT
The spotted surubim Pseudoplatystoma corruscans is a large migratory catfish native to the La Plata and San Francisco basins. However, its reproductive dynamics and behavior remain poorly understood. In this brief note, we provide the first record of the mating behavior of P. corruscans in natural conditions. This event was observed in the main channel of the Middle Uruguay River (Brazil). We followed and videotaped a school of approximately 25 fish, being five females (protruding abdomen and larger body size) and twenty males. The largest female led the school, followed by other fish. Males disputed repeatedly the posterior region of the females, while other males continuously repelled them. Eventually, some males, apparently exhausted, floated belly up. During this event, males were in state of pronounced agitation, and some had abrasions in the head. Polygamy characterized the mating behavior of P. corruscans.
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Figure 2. School of P. corruscans engaged in a “mating and spawning cycle”, as recorded in the main channel of the Uruguay River, southern Brazil. A. Shows the school of spotted surubim with females in the middle and males on the sides of the females; B and C. Show how the males compete for contact with the female's posterior ventral region, sinking at certain times and reappearing again in the female's posterior region.
Figure 2. School of P. corruscans engaged in a “mating and spawning cycle”, as recorded in the main channel of the Uruguay River, southern Brazil. A. Shows the school of spotted surubim with females in the middle and males on the sides of the females; B and C. Show how the males compete for contact with the female's posterior ventral region, sinking at certain times and reappearing again in the female's posterior region.
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